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Best way to clean a block and head

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  • Best way to clean a block and head

    Any thoughts? I was thinking vapour blasting but would soda be better/safer?
    sigpic

    1992 3b S2 Coupe

  • #2
    Take them to a machine shop and have them hot tanked?

    Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      Yep, as above.

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      • #4
        Again, as above and ask them blow out all the oil ways with an air-line once it's been done if you don't have a compressor at home, most machine shops will do this anyway a matter of course.
        1992 C4 100 2.8 Avant quattro, daily driver.
        1995 RS2, MTM K26/7, 380 BHP conversion.
        1996 C4 2.8 30V quattro, future project car...

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        • #5
          Thanks guys…so would you advise against a vapour or soda blast then? My understanding was soda was the way forward as no media left behind. Just about to order a compressor and a small blast cabinet for cleaning some bits and pieces or just prep for paint/powder coating
          sigpic

          1992 3b S2 Coupe

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          • #6
            Having compressed air is so useful, once you get your compressor you'll wonder how you ever managed without one. I can't really advise on blasting techniques as I don't know a great deal about it, I take you want to prep the block for paint?

            I have a basic sandblasting cabinet I got for cleaning up small items, that's currently got very fine blasting sand in it which cleans up stuff like turbine housings/manifolds, thermostat housings and brackets etc really very nicely. My only criticism of it is even though it's got pretty decent seals it still makes my workshop dusty, so I've taken to only ever using it outside.
            1992 C4 100 2.8 Avant quattro, daily driver.
            1995 RS2, MTM K26/7, 380 BHP conversion.
            1996 C4 2.8 30V quattro, future project car...

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            • #7
              Thanks Kit yep that was the plan but i figured it wouldn't leak too much dust. Maybe its an outside job for me too then
              sigpic

              1992 3b S2 Coupe

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              • #8
                If you getting a blasting cabinet make sure you buy a compressor that has the required cfm and a good size tank of at least 100litres. My compressor is 15cfm and that hammers away when blasting.

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                • #9
                  If you are not happy with the result of a hot tank dip and have facility to - soda is the way forward as once you blow the oil and waters ways, it can go in the bath to remove the residual soda being as its water soluable.

                  Vapour blasting makes things look lovely but could you live with the uncertainty of there being bits of glass/bead left in there stuck to some old oil?....
                  ​​​​​
                  ​​​​​​

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                  • #10
                    I would second what B5NUT says. I have a 50L compressor and small blast cabinet. I have added two big gas cylinders as receivers which help but need to stop every now and again to let the compressor catch it's breath. I also found I needed an extractor and more light in the cabinet. Oh and after that you will need a powder coating kit and an oven, the list goes on.

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, I have a 100L compressor the pump of which is designed to be able to run flat out for prolonged periods, even with that I can only do ten minutes of sand blasting at a time before I have to let the compressor cool down and catch up. And the dust is a PITA, I've tried hooking a high power vacuum cleaner up to the filtered vent but it still seems to make a bloody mess, so as I said I take it outside to use now.
                      1992 C4 100 2.8 Avant quattro, daily driver.
                      1995 RS2, MTM K26/7, 380 BHP conversion.
                      1996 C4 2.8 30V quattro, future project car...

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                      • #12
                        As for soda: I think the main advantage is you don't need to take the parts to a shop, you can just do it yourself. Soda is safe to use, hardly abrasive, dissolves in water. On the other hand I found it hard to set up my blaster properly. As for the aluminium parts, they will still stain afterwards if not coated or painted.

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                        • #13
                          The wife loved it when I put engine parts in the dishwasher!
                          Jason.

                          24v VR6 Turbo powered B3 Coupe Quattro coming soon........

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                          • #14
                            Yes, mine remembers me doing that still too!
                            sigpic

                            1992 3b S2 Coupe

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                            • #15
                              Jaswan .. at least wait 'till she's out of the house :-D

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